• ᴇᴍᴘᴇʀᴏʀ 帝OP
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    237 months ago

    Well done us!

    It just feels like the Tories are trying to wreck enough stuff to keep their corporate overlords happy, so they can get a cushy job afterwards.

    • HipPriest
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      87 months ago

      I genuinely believe they’re beyond giving a shit at this point. They know their cards are marked and it’s just like they’re trolling everyone at this point while they wait to get booted out

  • @Syldon@feddit.uk
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    147 months ago

    From a government that spends all its time doing deals on Whatsapp, it now wants to stop anyone else having privacy. you couldn’t make this shit up.

  • sapient [they/them]
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    87 months ago

    Wish governments would stop trying this bullshit. I swear it seems to come up every few years. They just don’t seem to be able to accept the idea of people defending themselves against mass surveillance for more than a few years <.<

  • @Auzy@beehaw.org
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    77 months ago

    They’re not going to erode encryption worldwide. Companies will simply pull out of Britain (if they haven’t already because of Brexit)

    • ᴇᴍᴘᴇʀᴏʀ 帝OP
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      117 months ago

      It’s in the article and mentioned by Liam below - send a strongly worded message to the House of Lords.

      It also can’t hurt to contact your MP.

      There may also be demonstrations against this.

      Unfortunately, the Tories have such a massive majority they can steamroller most things through.

      Medium to long term the best thing we can all do is vote and vote tactically.

  • @Rand0mA@lemmy.world
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    47 months ago

    Summary or article

    “The U.K. Parliament is on the verge of passing the Online Safety Bill, a far-reaching internet regulation that poses a serious threat to global privacy and democracy. The bill would grant the British government the power to force backdoors into messaging services, effectively undermining end-to-end encryption. This move has been met with strong opposition from civil society groups, technical experts, human rights advocates, and the companies providing encrypted messaging services. Despite widespread resistance, the U.K. government continues to deny the negative implications of the bill. Efforts to protect privacy and encryption through amendments have been largely disregarded. The bill’s potential consequences extend beyond the borders of the U.K., affecting individuals worldwide who value the right to private conversations.”