• IninewCrow
      link
      fedilink
      English
      185 months ago

      Obligatory “Are you on want medications and if so how long … has your dosage changed, have you changed, is this a new treatment treatment?”

      This comment isn’t meant to stigmatise the OP but just to rule out other circumstances. I have a couple of older relatives who have been in antidepressants and other mental health drugs and they’ve come to normalize witnessing weird things because now they just think it’s the drugs affecting their minds.

  • @Melatonin@lemmy.dbzer0.com
    link
    fedilink
    325 months ago

    Whatever you do, DO NOT buy one of those bedside sleep sound recorders. There’s just too much iffy shit you hear on those, if you listen closely and you hear stuff you can’t ever forget. I tried it once. The one I had would skip to the places where there was noise.

    I heard my snore stop suddenly, like my breath stopped or a hand over my mouth silenced me, and then I hear a clear whisper “Don’t wake up!”

    I don’t know if it was me talking or what, but I’d rather not know the noises in my room at night! Never again for me.

    • @CeruleanRuin@lemmings.world
      link
      fedilink
      English
      165 months ago

      I could never use one of those unless it also had a camera with it. If shadowmen are going to mess with me in my sleep, they’ll have to live with having their images captured on camera.

    • aebrer
      link
      fedilink
      85 months ago

      Creepy story! Do you still have the recording?!

    • @AeroLemming@lemm.ee
      link
      fedilink
      English
      35 months ago

      I feel like either this can’t be real or you embellished how sure you are of what you heard. If this really happened, the only reasonable response would be to put a knife under your pillow, install a night-vision security camera, and then spend the next few nights pretending to sleep because there’s no way you’re getting any real sleep. You’d also involve other people if you knew anyone.

      Burying your head in the sand and waiting for the guy living in your attic to kill you is definitely a BS response to what you described.

  • @CeruleanRuin@lemmings.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    255 months ago

    So a while back, the smoke alarm in the kid’s room directly below mine started going off for no apparent reason at 3 AM. Got up, went downstairs to silence it, checked everything in the house, smelled for smoke, looked at all the outlets, etc. Dug through drawers to find a new 9V battery and figured it was either a battery issue or a literal bug set it off. Never really got back to restful sleep after that, and the next day I kept worrying I had missed something and a shorted wire was quietly smoldering away in the wall somewhere.

    Next night, around the same time, I was again jolted out of sleep by a loud beep, but by the time I had gotten downstairs, there was no alarm going off, just my ears ringing. Asked everyone else if they heard an alarm, they said no. I must’ve hallucinated it, but I was also experiencing the most intense tinitus I have ever had. I don’t usually get tinitus at all, but my ears were ringing so loudly I couldn’t get back to sleep for a half hour afterwards.

    I believe I had a major psychosomatic event, which manifested tinitus. It’s either that or the timing of the random tinitus that woke me up was a bizarre coincidence.

  • @Omnificer@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    195 months ago

    Hallucinations while half-asleep are a well known phenomenon, so it’s very possible.

    If you’re trying to know for certain, that’s harder. You’ll have to consider a lot of things. Not all of them are likely, so how much digging you do is dependent on how concerned you are.

    Do you live alone? I assume you do, or already asked the people you live with.

    Are all your exterior doors and windows locked? Is anything missing or out of place? I think you’d have already noticed if you’d been robbed, but this is easy stuff to rule out.

    Do you have functioning Carbon Monoxide detectors? Do you have sleep apnaea? CO can lead to memory loss, sleep apnaea can contribute to sleep paralysis.

    Have you seen your door open while half asleep before? If this is recurring, you can do things like place hairs in the door that will fall if it opens.

    Have you done a sleep study? This can help determine if your REM cycle is frequently disrupted and if you need something like a CPAP.

  • @Smokeydope@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    175 months ago

    It could be a hallucination or it could not, check your monoxide detector, double check you aren’t schitzo/predisposed to more serious forms of hallucinations and setup a webcam pointed at the door + the painters tape like someone else suggested.

    Maybe it was a one off groggy sleep hallucination, maybe your being poisioned by gas, maybe your ass is haunted or someone crept into your home.

  • @FrostyTrichs@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    175 months ago

    Follow the other advice about carbon monoxide detectors and whatnot, but an easy trick to monitor your door is to tape the seams with something like painters tape or masking tape. If someone were to open your door while you’re sleeping they won’t be able to fix the tape even if they close the door when they leave.

    If it trips it doesn’t tell you who is opening the door or why but it might give you some peace of mind until you get a camera or something set up.

    • @SourWeasel@lemmy.today
      link
      fedilink
      85 months ago

      …they won’t be able to fix the tape even if they close the door when they leave.

      Jokes on you, I didn’t leave. I just re-tape the door before I hide under people’s bed.

      • @FrostyTrichs@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        65 months ago

        You’re about to be treated to a symphony of flatulence that one might compare to the sounds of repeatedly fisting a jar of mayonnaise.

    • Otter
      link
      fedilink
      English
      85 months ago

      Turns out we’ve been getting invisible IOUs for centuries, and she’s finally turning a profit. OP got the first visit

  • @Pyr_Pressure@lemmy.ca
    link
    fedilink
    115 months ago

    Do you have a window open somewhere? Or have a bathroom fan on?

    Sometimes the negative pressure at my house on a windy day when the window in my room is open can cause the bedroom door to close so fast it practically slams.

  • @qooqie@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    85 months ago

    Everyone keeps saying yes without giving you something to research. Look up “hypnopompic hallucinations”

    • Theroddd
      link
      fedilink
      25 months ago

      I see one person saying “yes” with no suggestions. That person did answer the question that was asked.

      You didn’t even answer the question.

  • @adhocfungus@midwest.social
    link
    fedilink
    75 months ago

    This happens to me almost every night. Usually while coming out of sleep, but sometimes while I’m still trying to fall asleep. It used to only happen when I was stressed about work, but once I had a kid it became very frequent.

    I hear/see the door open, hear my son’s door open, see giant spiders on the wall, hear someone rummaging through the fridge, hear my son screaming, etc. If I get up to check it’s always nothing.

      • @MotoAsh@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        45 months ago

        Every night isn’t good, but it’s totally normal once in a while. It’s just daydreaming or non-terror night terrors.

      • @adhocfungus@midwest.social
        link
        fedilink
        15 months ago

        It’s usually not scary, it just jolts me up and out of bed, which interrupts my already limited sleep. It’s definitely not great. I’m hoping it’ll calm down as my son gets older, but I won’t hold my breath.

  • EponymousBosh
    link
    fedilink
    65 months ago

    Yep, hypnogogic/hypnopompic hallucinations are extremely common and generally nothing to worry about. If they happen to you a lot, it might be a sign of a sleep disorder, but they aren’t connected to mental health issues.

  • SeaJ
    link
    fedilink
    35 months ago

    Hopefully you have a carbon monoxide detector.